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Posts Tagged ‘Video’

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VIDEO: Daily workouts can’t undo damage done from sitting all day (Rock Center)

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

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All quotes are from Dr. James Levine, Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic. Inventor of the standing desk.

ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS

  • - Americans sit more than ever before.
  • - “Like tobacco, sitting is hazardous to your health”
  • - A daily trip to the gym, while beneficial, can’t undo the damage done from sitting all day.
  • - “Being sedentary for nine hours a day at the office is bad for your health whether you go home and watch television afterwards or hit the gym. It is bad whether you are morbidly obese or marathon-runner thin. It appears that what is critical and maybe even more important than going to the gym, is breaking up that sitting time.”
  • - “People who are lean, even who don’t go to the gym, move about two and a quarter hours a day more than people with obesity. They fidget more and find ways to get up and move – more. Strong genetic component.”
  • - “If you take that historical view of this, you realize we’re living a completely different way to how we were designed.” (See more about our perspective on this concept here)

 

IMPACT OF SITTING

  • - The muscles stop moving all together and the heart slows.
  • - Calorie-burning rate plummets to about one calorie per minute — a third of what it would be if you were walking.
  • - Insulin effectiveness drops and the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes rises.
  • - Fat and cholesterol levels rise too.

 

LEVINE’S COMMON SENSE SOLUTIONS

  • - Spending less time at their desks.
  • - Take a walk with a friend at lunchtime.
  • - Have a walking meeting with a colleague.
  • - Go the restroom that is  farther away from your desk.

 

We agree that these are great suggestions. Considering implementing if you’re not already.

Here is an excerpt from our Optimize Your Health infographic describing how to live as, what we call, an Enduring Mover.

 

 

ITS GETTING TO BE THAT TIME OF YEAR AGAIN…

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Hi folks,

With the weather trying to warm up, at least in some parts of the country, we’re going to continue with some tips and guidance on preparing seeds and plantings for your garden. Gardening can be somewhat confusing or frustrating for some, but having some solid guidance can save you a lot of hassle and effort. And with success comes fresh herbs and vegetables, often at a fraction of what you pay at the store. So without further adieu…

1) 10 seed staring tips with videos and further reading for effectively getting your seedlings off to a good start.

2) Another helpful video on a simple way to get seeds started indoors.

3) An article on different types of peas. Pea plants are great plants to start early in the spring because they can tolerate colder weather are provide an early payoff for your gardening efforts.

4) A real nice article on types of lettuce that will re-grow after being cut. Sometimes I think that lettuce is too finicky to bother with trying to grow, but this makes me reconsider these gifts that keep on giving.

5) Herbs are some of my favorite things to grow because fresh herbs are awsome, it’s useful to always have them on hand, and they can be a bit pricey at the store. This article makes a strong argument for why parsley should be a part of your landscape.

So, let’s get thinking, planning, and acting to prepare for bountiful growing season.

Untitled

Friday, November 12th, 2010

Hug Your Farmer! from lovetomorrowtoday on Vimeo.

 

From Love Tomorrow Today

Everyday, we make decisions about the foods we eat. But where does that food come from? Who grows it? What goes into it? Really for the first time in history, it’s a question that’s difficult for most people to answer.

This is a story of one degree changes, about re-establishing the link between us and our food source. LTT examines a relationship between a local farmer and a store committed to supporting and sharing his story.

As we like to say, ‘hug your farmer!’

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