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Posts Tagged ‘Studies’

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DRINK UP – THE HOLIDAYS ARE COMING

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

No, not the spiked eggnog – drink water prior to your meals. Several studies have now shown that drinking water before and during meals promotes weight loss when coupled with a low calorie diet.

 

Specifically, drinking water (two cups) before a meal has been shown to reduce calories consumed, hunger after the meal, and result in 4.5 extra pounds lost over a three month period of time. This effect also seemed to be greater in older individuals.

 

So, as you prepare for the upcoming holidays, keep water around and accessible so that you are sure to drink a bunch of it every day. And as always, please drive safely.

 

Cheers,
Larry

Source

FAT CELLS ARE MORE THAN JUST STORAGE DEPOTS FOR CALORIES

Friday, September 3rd, 2010

People once thought fat cells were inert storage depots for extra calories. However, we now know fat cells secrete certain hormones and other substances. For example, fat secretes:

 

Leptin: signals the brain about the amount of energy in the body, helps controls appetite

 

Adiponectin: Makes the body more sensitive to insulin and controls blood sugar levels.

 

New research identifies that fat secretes:
80 different proteins!
20 proteins not previously detected.

 

BOTTOM LINE:
Fat actively secretes substances into the blood, which influence other tissue. Findings could pave the way for a better understanding of the role that hormone-secreting fat cells play in heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other diseases.

 

CITATION

 


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CAN REDUCE THE GENETIC PREDISPOSITION TO OBESITY BY 40%

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

Everyone can benefit from exercise, but a new study shows that individuals with a genetic predisposition to obesity can benefit even more.

 

THE STUDY
- Study used a cohort of 20,430 people living in Norwich, UK

 

- Examined 12 different genetic variants which are known to increase the risk of obesity.

 

- Assessed individuals genetic susceptibility to obesity

 

- Assessed total physical activity of these individuals.

 

- Examine if a higher ‘genetic predisposition score’ was associated with a higher obesity risk

 

- Examined whether a physically activity lessens the genetic influence on obesity risk.

 

RESULTS

 

- Each additional obesity-susceptibility gene variant increased obesity risk by 1.1 fold

 

- However, physical active individuals had a 40% lower risk vs inactive people.

 

BOTTOM LINE

 

Genetic predisposition to obesity can be reduced by AN AVERAGE of 40% through increased physical activity.

 

CITATION
http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000332

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